New York Makes Work Pay - Developing a path to employment for New Yorkers with disabilities

Occupational Selection Data Sources

The MIG research team used New York State Department of Labor data on long-term employment projections for 2006–2016 to select occupations in New York State that:

Technical information about New York State Department of Labor's Employment Projects for 2006–2016 can be found at:

For the selected occupations, we accessed further information from a variety of sources to create a more complete description of each occupation. These descriptions were designed to provide persons with disabilities, and those who provide them services and supports, with essential information to plan individual careers. We used the most current data available at the time of creating this resource.

The following information was taken from the New York State Department of Labor’s Employment Projects for 2006–2016 (http://www.labor.state.ny.us/stats/lsproj.shtm):

The following information was taken from the New York State data from the 2005–2007 American Community Survey (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/):

Information on occupational skills was taken from the Occupational Information Network (O*Net), a national database (http://online.onetcenter.org/).

Information on job descriptions was taken primarily from the Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010–2011 (http://www.bls.gov/OCO/) although in some instances we used information from O*Net Online (http://online.onetcenter.org/), the State of California Employment Development Department  regarding Construction Careers (http://www.calmis.ca.gov/file/construction/const-Supvrs-mgrs-const-trades-extraction-wkrs.pdf ), and Career Overview.Com (http://www.careeroverview.com/counter-clerk-careers.html ).

Information on educational costs was taken from the National Center for Education Statistics:

When including information on the cost of education, we compared average costs of public, in-state tuition and fees in New York, with national averages available through the National Center for Education Statistics. We did not include any New York state-specific statistics, unless the cost in New York State was significantly less expensive (by more than $500) than the national average.